Sweet, L (2002) Telephone interviewing: Is it compatible with interpretive phenomenological research? Authors of qualitative research texts are direct in asserting the superiority of face-to-face interviews in those infrequent situations when they discuss telephones for qualitative research at all.

This paper describes how telephone interviewing was used in a recently conducted interpretive phenomenological study, and argues that this is a methodologically and economically valuable data collection technique in qualitative research. Shuy (2002) asserted that telephone interviewing must employ highly structured, closed ended questions, whereas in-person interviews simulate natural, everyday conversation and produces more self-generated responses. Telephone interviewing is becoming an increasingly popular form of interview for qualitative research (Carr and Worth 2001). Whilst there have been discussions in the literature on logistical advantages and disadvantages of telephone interviewing, there has been little debate as to whether this form of interview is compatible with qualitative health research. Qualitative researchers should not rely exclusively on the face-to-face interview, as the telephone interview can be an equally valuable data collection approach. Contemporary Nurse 12(1): 58 – 63 . Qualitative researchers should not rely exclusively on the face-to-face interview, as the telephone interview can be an equally valuable data collection approach. This paper describes how telephone interviewing was used in a recently conducted interpretive phenomenological study, and argues that this is a methodologically and economically valuable data collection technique in qualitative research. Google Scholar | Crossref | Medline