Consumer neuroscience . This research was supported in part by grants from the Center for Be-havioral Decision Research at Carnegie Mellon and the Russell Sage Foundation, an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship to Rick, and a Mac-Arthur Foundation network grant to Loewenstein. 000 JOURNAL OF CONSUMER RESEARCH Please use DOI when citing. This research was supported in part by grants from the Center for Be-havioral Decision Research at Carnegie Mellon and the Russell Sage Foundation, an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship to Rick, and a Mac-Arthur Foundation network grant to Loewenstein. Research was mostly published in the Journal of Neuroscience. Electronic copy available at : http ://ssrn.com /abstract = 2367803 78 2012 by JOURNAL OF CONSUMER RESEARCH, Inc. Vol. preference toward the high-functionality option in the near future, which is consistent with their distant-future prefer-ence. In the following exposition, this sub-network will be referred to as traditional consumer decision-making research. This review is based in part on systematic analyses of articles that have been published in the leading consumer research journals over the past 30 years. John Deighton served as editor and Baba Shiv served as associate editor for this article. He then completed a two-year postdoctoral fellowship at Wharton. Rick received his Ph.D. in Behavioral Decision Research from Carnegie Mellon in 2007, where he was supported by a Graduate Research Fellowship from the National Science Foundation. Based on numerous findings from psychology, communication research, and consumer research, we identify a core set of general principles of affect regulation in consumer behavior.

John Deighton served as editor and Baba Shiv served as associate editor for this article. ( 2010 ), “ The Underdog Effect: The Marketing of Disadvantage and Determination Through Brand Biography ,” Journal of Consumer Research, 37 (5), 775 – 90 . Google Scholar Paharia, Neeru, Keinan, Anat, Avery, Jill, Schor, Juliet B. 6.1.

Page numbers are not final. For the distant future, because consumers naturally focus on product functionality, the effect of price infor- Nunes, Joseph C., Drèze, Xavier (2006), “ The Endowed Progress Effect: How Artificial Advancement Increases Effort,” Journal of Consumer Research, 32 (4), 504 – 12. 40 June 2013