Edgar Allan Poe and Gothic Imagery in "The Cask of Amontillado" 2286 Words | 10 Pages. Get an answer for 'What is an example of imagery "The Cask of Amontillado"?' When he hears that Montresor has “a pipe of what passes for Amontillado,” his “energies,” as Booker would... Three Act Plot Analysis Montresor tells Fortunato he has a “pipe of what passes for Amontillado.” In this context, “pipe” and “cask” mean the same thing. Amontillado!Fortunato is reveling in the carnival spirit, but it’s not enough. Alyssa Becker “The Cask of Amontillado” Imagery Analysis In “The Cask of Amontillado,” Edgar Allen Poe uses many examples of imagery, such as the descriptions of the carnival, characters, the walk through the catacombs, and much more throughout the story to build suspense and intrigue for the readers and add to the mystery of Montresor’s underlining actions of the … In “The Cask of Amontillado,” Poe tells a … The use of symbolism in “The Cask of Amontillado” Edgar Allen Poe has always been known for his dark, mysterious, and twisted stories. As you may have suspected, “cask” also literally means “casket.” Imagery The Cask Of Amontillado. Here are some examples of imagery "Its walls had been lined with human remains, piled to the vault overhead, in the fashion of the great catacombs of Paris" (Poe ). and find homework help for other The Cask of Amontillado questions at eNotes Imagery is the use of words that appeal to to one or more of the senses. Imagery was used throughout the story. "The Cask of Amontillado" is a story of revenge, but the reader is never told exactly what Fortunato did to warrant such vengeance. Nearly all of his stories are praised, and they have some sort of unknown motive and background to them.

Casks, by the way, are barrels for storing wine or other drinks, and they come in many sizes. Throughout his story "A Cask of Amontillado" Poe uses a lot of imagery. Foreshadowing the Fate in “The Cask of Amontillado” In “Cask of Amontillado,” Edgar Allan Poe presents a murderous tale of revenge revealed as the confession of a man who murdered another man over fifty years ago because of an “insult.” During a carnival festival, the murderer led his companion to the catacombs where he buried the man alive. In “The Cask of Amontillado,” Edgar Allen Poe uses many examples of imagery, such as the descriptions of the carnival, characters, the walk through the catacombs, and much more throughout the story to build suspense and intrigue for the readers and add to the mystery of Montresor’s underlining actions of the revenge and deception of the foolish Fortunado.