The Genetic Information and Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 (GINA) protects the genetic privacy of the public, including research participants. This article examines the current landscape of genetic privacy to identify the roles that the law does or should play, with a focus on federal statutes and regulations, including the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA). The takeaway from these developments is simple: Genetic privacy is well on its way to becoming obsolete, thanks to the voluntary use of cheap DNA testing technology and … Creating a right to genetic privacy will come at a price, Korn concluded, and that price will be to hamper the nation's system of medical care and research. Simply creating a right to genetic privacy is a recipe for decades of legal wrangling, which would keep lawyers like Anderson busy but would not be in the best interests of anyone else. Medical confidentiality in clinical genetics poses an important question about its scope, which would be in line with professional ethics and simple honesty. The passage of GINA makes it illegal for health insurers or employers from requesting or requiring genetic information of an individual or of family members (and further prohibits the discriminatory use of such information). Genetic privacy and the use of archival human material in genetic studies – current perspectives D Gareth Jones Department of Anatomy, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand Abstract: There has been considerable debate over a number of years on the ethical issues raised by the research uses to which archival human material can be put. Genetic privacy The ability to identify an individual from their anonymous genome sequence, using a clever algorithm and data from public databases, threatens the principle of …
Agencies such as the NIH reward the discovery of vulnerabilities in their computer systems—before criminals can exploit them.

The Scientist's articles tagged with: genetic privacy.