Still, some of his audiences suspected he was not truly a fugitive slave.

The North Star was a nineteenth-century anti-slavery newspaper published from the Talman Building in Rochester, New York by abolitionist Frederick Douglass. The paper commenced publication on December 3, 1847 and ceased as The North Star in June 1851 when it merged with Gerrit Smith's Liberty Party Paper (based in Syracuse, New York) to form Frederick Douglass' Paper. The paper commenced publication on December 3, 1847 and ceased as The North Star in June 1851 when it merged with Gerrit Smith's Liberty Party Paper (based in Syracuse, New York) to form Frederick Douglass' Paper.

After he ran away, Douglass tirelessly fought for emancipation and full citizenship for African Americans. All the other newly available newspapers are digitized from original paper issues of Frederick Douglass’ Paper, February 29, 1856-June 8, 1860, already in our collections.This newspaper was the result of Douglass’ merger of The North Star (Rochester, N.Y), with another abolitionist newspaper, the Liberty Party Paper (Syracuse, N.Y.).
Frederick Douglass first learned to read and write at the age of 12 from a Baltimore slaveholder's wife. The North Star, later Frederick Douglass’ Paper, antislavery newspaperpublished by African American abolitionist Frederick Douglass.First published on December 3, 1847, using funds Douglass earned during a speaking tour in Great Britain and Ireland, The North Star soon developed into one of the most influential African American antislavery publications of the pre-Civil War era. Unanswered Questions Why did Churchill replace Chamberlain as Britain's new prime minister shortly after World War 2 began

What was the name of Frederick Douglass antislavery newspaper? The North Star was a nineteenth-century anti-slavery newspaper published from the Talman Building in Rochester, New York by abolitionist Frederick Douglass.

Name Frederick Douglass Birth Date c. February, 1818 Death Date February 20, 1895 Did You Know? (By this time, he was a well-known and -respected orator, so his name was recognizable.) Despite the failure of earlier African American newspapers, Douglass founded the North Star in December 1847. Frederick Douglass (February 14, 1817 - February 20, 1895) American abolitionist, journalist, and orator, often referred to as the "father" of the modern civil rights movement.

David Ruggles was a friend to Frederick Douglass, the first full-time black activist and a lead conductor on the Underground Railroad.
In 1851, he merged that paper with another journal called The Liberty Party Paper and renamed the new publication Frederick Douglass' Paper. In 1845, he published his first autobiography, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, to lay those doubts to rest. David Ruggles was a 19th-century Renaissance man, a … 1817. Frederick Douglass, one of the best known and most articulate free black spokesmen during the antebellum years, was born a slave ca. Douglass's fame as an orator increased as he traveled. The narrative gave a clear record of names … In 1847, nine years after escaping from slavery, Frederick Douglass published the first edition of The North Star in Rochester, New York.