The process of decolonising research methodology is an ethical, ontological and political exercise rather than simply one of approach and ways of producing knowledge. He then contrasts the PAR research methods advocated for by Tuhiwai Smith with those that he engages with in Latin America.

To the colonized, the term 'research' is conflated with European colonialism; the ways in which academic research has been implicated in the throes of imperialism remains a painful memory. Decolonizing Methodologies - Research And Indigenous Peoples In stock. Amongst the nine courses, Decolonial Dialogues particularly found ‘Co-Decolonizing Research Methods: Towards Research Sustaining Indigenous and ‘Other’ Community Engaged Ways of Knowing’ an interesting course which aligns with the premise behind the space to feature.

The author describes the devastating effects of such research on indigenous peoples and articulates a new Indigenous Research Agenda which aims to replace former Western academic methods.

A couple of weeks ago, on October 25 th the Rutgers Advanced Institute for Critical Caribbean Studies with the sponsorship of the Center for Cultural Analysis and the Program in Comparative Literature held a series of activities focused on decoloniality in South Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean. He then contrasts the PAR research methods advocated for by Tuhiwai Smith with those that he engages with in Latin America.

View Decolonial Methodologies Research Papers on Academia.edu for free. While the two approaches to PAR engage in very different, traditional vs non-traditional, research methods, they have similar decolonial outcomes in that they place Indigenous sovereignty at the centre of decision-making practices. Interview method is best associated with qualitative research which has its roots in early practices of anthropology and sociology.

Decolonial Research Methods in Latin America and the Caribbean.

Indeed, interview has been a popular method of research for many qualitative researchers to elicit people’s lived experiences, stories and perceptions about a particular social phenomenon (Kvale, 2005).

While the two approaches to PAR engage in very different, traditional vs non-traditional, research methods, they have similar decolonial outcomes in that they place Indigenous sovereignty at the centre of decision-making practices.