On February 2, 1781, Maryland became the last state … The first clause of Article 6 simply states that any debts created before the adoption of the United States Constitution are to be considered valid, in the same form they were held under the Articles of … 1) the articles of confederation had NO judicial branch 2) the articles also had NO executive branch 3) the federal government was to weak and needed more power. Articles of Confederation and perpetual Union between the States of New Hampshire, Massachusetts-bay, Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia. It was drafted by the Continental Congress and sent to the thirteen original states for ratification in November 1777. The ratification process was important, as without it the document did not come into effect. Choose from 500 different sets of the articles of confederation chapter 6 flashcards on Quizlet. The Stile of this Confederacy shall be "The United States of America."

The Articles of Confederation or Articles was a written agreement which laid the guidelines for the functioning of the national government. The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union — 1777 To all to whom these Presents shall come, we the undersigned Delegates of the States affixed to our Names, send greeting. Articles of Confederation and perpetual Union between the states of New Hampshire, Massachusetts-bay Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia. Even the powers given exclusively to Congress, such as making war and peace, are transferable to a state when Congress approves. Article 6, in attempting to define the limitations of state powers, actually does more to indicate the threats facing the young nation and the powerless nature of Congress. Article II. Learn the articles of confederation chapter 6 with free interactive flashcards. Article I.